(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Thoreau Society Bulletin"

7<fe 

THOREAU SOCIETY 



The Thoreau Society, Inc. , Is an Informal 
gathering of students and followers of Henry David 
Thoreau. Walter Harding, State University College, 
Geneseo, New lork, president, secretary and 
treasurer; Mrs. Herbert Hoomer, Concord, Mass., 
vice-president. Membership $2.00 a year: life 
membership $25.00. 



BULLETIN 



BULLETIN EIGHTY-SEVEN 

THE 1964 ANNUAL MEETING . . . 

The 1964. annual meeting of the Thoreau Society 
will be held in the First Parish Church of Concord 
at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 11. Speaker of the 
Day will be William Stuart Nelson, Vice President of 
Howard University, who will talk on Thoreau and the 
struggle for integration today. Walter Harding will 
deliver the presidential address on "Thoreau at 
Walden Pond," a chapter from his forthcoming biog- 
raphy of Thoreau. 

Luncheon for a limited number of people will be 
served at noon. Those wishing to make reservations 
should write in advance to Mrs. Herbert Hosmer, 22 
Elm Street. Concord, Mass.. 

For the afternoon, there will be a tour of Con- 
cord •onducted by members of the local Thoreau group. 

The evening session will include an illustrated 
lecture on "Thoreau and Mushrooms" by W. Stephen 
Thomas, director of the Rochester Museum of Arts and 
Sciences, and another of the "Sounds of Thoreau 1 s 
Journal" tape-reeordingp compiled by Edwin Way 
Teale, Roland Robbins, and David Dean. 

THE 1964 ANNUAL ELECTION 

The nominating committee (Robert Wild, chairman; 
Norman Dodge, and Joseph Ishill) presents the fol- 
lowing slate of officers for election at the annual 
meeting: 

For president, Roland Robbins 
For president-elect, Mrs. Herbert Hosmer 
For vice-president, Robert Needbam 
For secretary-treasurer, Walter Harding 
For the executive committee for three years, 
Mrs. Edmund Fenn and Robert Needham. 

A VOLUME FROM THOREAU' S LIBRARY, by Ralph H. Orth 

After many years, what appears to be a volume 
from Thoreau* s personal library has shown up in the 
possession of Professor Betty Bandel of the Depart- 
ment of English of the University of Vermont. It is 
Thomas Carlyle's Life of Friedrich Schiller . New 
York (George Dearborn & Co.), 1837, listed by 
Thoreau himself as "Life of Schiller. By Carlyle. 
New York. 1 v." but further identified in Walter 
Harding's Thoreau' g Library (Charlottesville, Va.), 
1957. 

Apparent proof of its possession by Thoreau is 
the inscription on the flyleaf, not in Thoreau' s 
handwriting: 

Henry D. Thoreau 
from L. W, — 
Jan. 1, 1841 — 



IF THIS PARAGRAPH IS CHECKED 
IK RED, YOUR IlEIBERSHIP EX- 
PIRES WITH THIS ISSUE. RE- 
NEWAL, $2.00. LIFE IEBER- 
SHIP, $25.00. DUES SHOULD BE 
SENT TO THE SECRETARY, WALTER 
HARDING, STATE UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE, GENESEO, NEW YORK SPRING, 1964 

The identity of L. W. remains undiscovered, 
despite a check of the journals and letters, and 
the principal biographies of Thoreau. Indeed, 
the initials may not be L. W. at all, but I. W. 
— if so, possibly those of Isaiah T. Williams, 
the Buffalo law student who became Thoreau' s 
"disciple" in 1841 ( Correspondence . 1958, p. A3). 
Whether the month is actually "Jan." and not 
"Jun." adds a further note of difficulty to the 
transcription. 

The path of the volume from Concord to Vermont 
is uncertain. Professor Bandel received it as a 
gift from the Reverend Robert Snelling, formerly 
pastor of the Essex Junction Congregational 
Church, and now pastor of the Community Church of 
Warren, Arizona. In a letter on October 17, 1963, 
Mr. Snelling writes: 

I believe this volume came to me from my 
father' s library. The closest I can bring 
the volume to Walden Pond would be Newton 
Center Theological School (Boston) , where 
my father studied during the 90' s. He may 
have obtained this volume during his years 
there, but I do not know this to be true. 
The volume itself is only in fair physical 
condition; the front cover and the binding on the 
spine are almost completely detached. There are 
no annotations. The first two stanzas of Words- 
worth' s poem beginning "So fair, so sweet, withal 
so sensitive," in a handwriting not Thoreau' s, 
appear on a cut-down sheet of letter paper insert- 
ed in the volume. 

Professor Bandel has stated that she intends 
to give the volume to the library of the Univer- 
sity of Vermont. 

University of Vermont 

ADDITIONS TO THE THOREAU BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . WH 

Adams, Thomas Boylston. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY - 
TWO YEARS JOURNEY TOWARD 00ND0RD. New York: 
Pierpont Morgan Library, 1962. Unpaged. "An 
address delivered before the fellows of the 
Pierpont Morgan Library, April 15, 1962. 200 
copies printed." 

AMERICAN REVIEW (Delhi). THOREAU AND INDIA. New 
Delhi: United States Information Service, 
1962. A1 pp. 

Baym, Nina Zippin. THE PARADOXICAL HERO IN 

THOREAU' S WRITI'T.S. Unpublished Harvard Uni- 
versity thesis, 1963. 

Cameron, Kenneth W. "Anti-Slavery Song Books in 
Thoreau' 6 Library." EMERSON SOC. QUAR. , 
XXXVI (1964), 52-121. 
. "Manuscript Pages from Thoreau' s 'Night 



and Moonlight," ESQ, XXXV (196-4), 82-84. 
. "Thoreau Manuscripts — Ungathered and 

Migrant." ESQ, XXXV O964), 84-86. 
. THOREAU' S LITERARY NOTEBOOK IN THE LIBRARY 

OF CONGRESS. Hartford: Transcendental Books, 

1964, 375pp. $20. A facsimile reproduction. 
Cardenas, Eduardo. "Thoreau." in BIOGRAFIAS 

BREVES. Hanover, Pa.: Libros de America, 1963, 

p. 819. A brief biography. 
Drucker, D.B. LE JOUR SE LEVE. Avignon, France: 

Aubanel Editeur, 1955* pp. 140-141, favorable 

comment on Thoreau 1 s "Civil Disobedience." 
Eiseley, Loren. FRANCIS BACON AND THE MODERN 

DILEMMA. Lincoln: University of Neb. , 1963. 

Contains a lengthy commentary on Thoreau' s 

MAINE WOODS. 
Fasel, Ida. "Emily Dickinson's Walden." IOWA 

ENGLISH YEARBOOK, VII (Fall, 1962), 22-28. 

Thoreau' s influence on E.D. 
Gottsoho, Samuel. "Thoreau y las flores del campo." 

CENIT, Nov. 1962, pp. 3891 -4. "Thoreau and 

Wild Flowers" trans, into Spanish by V. Munoz. 
Gozzi, Raymond. "The Meaning of the ' Complemental 

Verses' in WALDEN," EMERSON SOC. QUAR., XXXV 

(1964), 79-82. 
Hagenbach, Allen W. HUT MOOD (THOREAU 

TAUNTS "MONEY-CHANGER"). Allentown, 

Pa.: Pub. by the author, 1964. 

26pp. An unusual little pamphlet 

commenting on life today seen 

through the eyes of a Thoreauvian. 
Harding, Walter. "Thoreau at Walden." 

HARVARD ALUMNI BULLETIN, LXVI 

(March 21, 1964), 468-473. A chap- 
ter from the forthcoming biography. 
Harvey, Arthur. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF 

CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE. Raymond, N.H.: 

Mimeo. by the author, 1961. 28pp. 

Much on T's "Civil Disobedience." 
HERALD OF PROGRESS. "Personal Items." 

III (May 24, 1862). A hithnrto un- 
noticed news item on Thoreau' a 
death, in a Spiritualist newspaper. 1 

Higashiyama, Masayoshi. "Thoreau: A 
Japanese View," ENGLISH AND AMER- 
ICAN LITERATURE (Kwansei Gakuin 
University), VII (Oct. 1962), 76- 
83J. 

Hyman, Stanley Edgar. "Henry Thoreau 
in Our Time" and "Henry Thoreau 
Once More." in THE PROMISED END. 
Cleveland: World, 1963. pp. 23-35, 
39-48. 

Jacobson, Arthur C. "Tuberculosis and 
the Creative Mind." MEDIGAL 
LIBRARY AND HISTORICAL JOURNAL, V 
(Dec. 1907), 225-230. Includes 
commentary on influence of tubercu- 
losis on Thoreau. 

Kasegawa, Koh. "An Interpretation of 
Thoreau' s 'Civil Disobedience,'" 
AOYAMA JOURNAL OF GENERAL EDUCATION, 

IV (Nov. 1963), 1-19. A paragraph 
by paragraph analysis of the essay. 

. "Thoreau and the Bhagavad-Gita. " 

THOUGHTS CURRENT IN ENGLISH LITERA- 
TURE, (Japan), XXXVI (Dec. 1963), 
43-61. 

. "Thoreau* s WALDEN: A Nature-Myth. " 

STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (Eng- 
list Literary Society of Japan) , 
XXXIX (Nov. 1963), 213-240. 

Kopp, Charles C. THE MYSTICISM OF HENRY DAVID 



THOREAU. Penn State University, 1963. Unpublish- 
ed Ph.D. dissertation. 

Langton, Jane. THE TRANSCENDENTAL MURDER. New 
York: Harper & Row, 1964, 248pp. $3.95. An 
amusing murder mystery, est in contemporary 
Concord, which involves such skullduggery as 
unearthing a love-affair between Emily Dick- 
inson and Thoreau, and murdering someone by 
dropping a bust of Louisa May Alcott on her 
head, The secretary of the Thoreau Society 
is one of the central characters! 

. The Same. Review. CONCORD JOURNAL. Feb. 

20, 1964. 

More, Paul Elmer. "A Hermit's Notes on Thoreau" 

and "Thoreau 1 s Journal." in SHELBURNE ESSAYS 
ON AMERICAN LITERATURE. New York: Harcourt 
Brace, 1963. pp. 199-212, 213-229. Two im- 
portant essays of half a century ago on 
Thoreau, now readily available in an inexpen- 
sive paperback ($2.45). 

Porte, Joel Miles. EMERSON AND THOREAU: TRAN- 
SCENDENTALISM IN CONFLICT. Cambridge: Harvard 
Harvard, 1962. Unpublished thesis. 

Schwaber. Paul. "Thoreau' s Development in WALDEN." 
fcer, 1963), 64-77. 




"Tell me again. What ivas it you liked about 'Walden'?" 

Drawing by Saxon, e 1963 The New Yorker Magazine, 
Inc. October 5, 1963. 



Stanton, Will. "The Friends of 



1964, pp. 73, 110-111. A short 
story with a Thoreau devotee as 
one of the characters* 

Thoreau, Henry David. COLLECTED 
POEMS. Edited by Carl Bode. 
New enlarged edition. Balti- 
more: Johns Hopkins Press, 1964* 
413pp. $6.95. In 1943 Bode 
edited the first collected edi- 
tion of T ' s poems— and inciden- 
tally the first variorum edition 
of any American poet. For yeara 
now it has been out of print and 
commanding a real premium on the 
rare book market. Now it has 
been reprinted from the same 
plates with thirteen additional 
poems that have since come to 
light appended. It is good to 
have T's poetry thus readily 
available once more in an edi- 
tion that is both thoroughly 
annotated and includes all the variants. But 
it is unfortunate that the exigencies of pub- 
lishing necessitated using the old plates thus 
perpetuating in the T canon two poems he did 
not write (tho a note in the back points out 
this error) and the misreading of several lines 
in other poems* 

. JOURNAL (Dover edition). Review. EMERSON 

SOC. QUART., XXXVII (1964), 92. 

Tryon, W.S. PARNASSUS CORNER: A LIFE OF JAMES T. 
FIELDS PUBLISHER TO THE VICTORIANS. Boston: 
Houghton Mifflin, 1963. 445pp. Includes some 
new information on Thoreau' s relations with his 
publishers. 

Weaver, Richard M. "Two Types of American Individu- 
alism." MODERN AGE, VII (Spring, 1963), 119- 
134. A contrast of Thoreau and John Randolph 
of Roanoke. 

William3, Paul 0. "Emerson Guided: Walks with 
Thoreau and Channing." EMERSON SOC. QUAR. , 
XXXV (1964), 66-68. 

ANOTHER FORGOTTEN OBITUARY FOR THOREAU. . . WH 

THE NATIONAL ALMANAC FOR 1863 (Philadelphia: 
George W. Childs, 1863, p. 640) prints the following 
hitherto unnoticed obituary of Thoreau among its 
"American Obituaries — 1862": 

. Thoreau. David Hrxr.v. died in Concord, Ma>s., 
May k II,- was born in that town, July 1" 1S17 
graduated .it Harvard College in 1337, taught 
schtx 1 1* r three y irs altogether, was a memberW 
imilY of i; ilph VTahl 1 Em rson, and, after 
- «il»l rt. 1 hims ■',:' bv manual 
1 ' il-m:iker, ; 1 titer, surveyor, 

N vv York, ke . l/ve.l' f - : "•""'■ 




Fabor 


~T t\\ 




cnrli 


.; 


1 , . ■ 


\ -u 


11 n 


ii|i<] i 


! 

1 


t \^ 


\ 


si ] 






\\ ts 






V- ■ \ 







]-i- 



■\v 



"your Walden Pond needs cleaning out." 

c 1963 The New lork Times Company. Reprinted 
by permission from the issue of Nov. 17, 1963 

DR. HOWARD ZAHNISER, 1906-1964 

It is our sad duty to record the death of Dr. 
Howard Zahniser, President of the Thoreau Society 
in 1956-1957, long-time member of the Thoreau Soci- 
ety executive committee, and one of the most active 
members of the society. Dr. Zahniser died in his 
sleep at his home in Hyattsville, Md. , on May 6, 
1964. Since 1945 he had been executive secretary 
of the Wilderness Society and in the words of Sec- 
retary of the Interior Stewart L. Udall, the "most 
dedicated and faithful advocate of the country's 
leading conservationists." His friendliness, his 
enthusiasm, his warm smile, and his indef agitable 
energy made him one of the most beloved members of 
our society. 

BACK PUBLICATIONS .... 

The following back publications of the 
Thoreau Society are available from the secretary: 
Reprint of Bulletins 1-9, 500; Bulletins 12-15, 18, 
21-66, 69-70, 72-83, 85, 86, 500 each; Booklets 3, 
5, 8, 10, 14, 15, 500 each; Booklets 6, 7, 9, 11, 
16, 18, 19, $1.00 each. Note that a number of bul- 
letins which were once out of print are now back in 
print once more. 

NOTES AND QUERIES .... 

The "girlie" magazine Nugget . VIII (Nov. 1963) 
offers a new method of selling Walden . They sug- 
gest a book jacket showing a man about to embrace 
a nude woman and blurb "He called himself a 'Tran- 
scendentalist, 1 but he was all man, guys, like you 
and me. . . He tried to go two years without a 
woman — but could he?. . . Could you?" 

The "Tom Swifty" craze has hit the Thoreau 
fans: Said Emerson to Thoreau in jail, "Don't you 
feel Walled-in?" 

A friend in a mid-Western college swears that 
this happened: One of the football stars dropped 
out of his American literature class half way 
through the semester and later greeted him on the 
campus with, "Say, that book by Thoreau we were 
reading when I dropped out was exciting. Tell me, 
did Walden die in the end?" 



Thoreau Society President-elect Roland Robbins 
now manufactures full-sized reproductions of 
Thoreau' s cabin. Here is one of his advertisements: 



The World Famous THOREAU'S WALDEN CABIN 



deliberately,** i h< irk.au 



■ 



■ 




KOI VMl \\. lUtKBlN*. Iil.lt. =2. I incolr 
THrplmric: (■.,!,• f,!7 2.">'»-8?(W 



Edwin Way Teale points out to us that in 1865 
John Burroughs wrote Myron Benton: "I am reading 
^horeau' s/ Cape Cod betimes. ... How so much juice 
can be extracted from sand is a mystery." (Clara 
Barrus, The Life and Letters of John Burroughs . I, 
103). 

Mr. Raymond P. Tripp, Jr., of Toronto, Ontario, 
has kindly presented to the Thoreau Society Archives 
in the Concord Free Public Library a copy of his 
University of Toronto master's thesis Communication 
and the Unity of WALDEN : A Thematic and Structural 
StudvT l963TT " 

Mrs. Michael J. Matera of Port Washington, N.Y. 
has donated a copy of Joseph Wood Krutch* s HENRY 
DAVID THOREAU to the White House Library in the name 
of the Thoreau Society. Mrs. Matera' s grandfather 
was a first cousin of Thoreau' s mother. Prof. Ben- 
jamin Gronewold of Buffalo, N.Y.; Ira Hoover of Wil- 
mington, Del.; and Paul Oehser of Washington, D.C. 
all also volunteered copies of the Krutch book. We 
now lack only the Carl and Margaret Rollins' edition 
of Thoreau' s ON THE DUTY OF CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE (New 
Haven, 1928) for the White House Library. Can any- 
one help us locate a copy of that? 

After many years of dormancy, the Concord 
Thoreau Discussion Group has revived with a bang and 
has been holding regular monthly meetings this 
spring. People in the area who are interested in at- 
tending should get in touch with Mrs. Edmund Fenn, 
Alcott Road, Concord. 

In answer to our query in the winter bulletin, 
August Derleth (Sauk City, Wise.) suggests that 
Thoreau' s plum cake could have been a bread with 
plums inserted, rather than a cake, and says that he 
is familiar with both pear bread and prune bread in 
Wisconsin. And that reminds us of the oft-repeated 
assertion that Thoreau was the inventor of raisin 
bread. Can anyone prove— or disprove that assertion? 

I am indebted to the following for information 
used in this bulletin: H.Adel, T.Bailey, M.Bodfish, 
M.Campbell, L.Digby, R.Ganley, S.Hosmer, R.Hull, K. 
Kasegawa, A.Kovar, L.Kleinfeld, D.Kamen-Kaye, A. 
Lownes, R.Meeker, R.Machemer, V.Munoz, M.Moss, L. 
Maynard, E.Phillips, G.Rohman, R.Schaedle, E.Teale, 
R.Wheeler, J.Wyllie, and H.Wiggins. Please keep the 
secretary informed of new Thoreau items. 

The cost of printing this bulletin was paid for 
in part by the life memberships of Mrs. Notburga B. 
Lewittes of Fishkill, New York, and Prof. Alex Kern 
of Iowa City, Iowa. 



A SOURCE FOR A WALDEN ANECDOTE . . . . WH 



In the final chapter of WALDEN, Thoreau 
speaks of: 

We read that the traveller asked the boy 
if the swamp before him had a hard bottom. 
The boy replied that it had. But present- 
ly the traveller's horse sank in up to the 
girths, and he observed to the boy, "I 
thought you said that this bog had a hard 
bottom." "So it has," answered the latter, 
"but you have not got half way to it yet." 
It is interesting to note therefore that the 
following anecdote appears in the local Concord 
YEOMAN'S GAZETTE for November 22, 1828 (when 
Thoreau was only eleven years old) and is un- 
doubtedly the direct source of his WALDEN remark: 
A young fellow, riding down a steep hill, 
and doubting the foot of it was boggish, 
called out to a clown that was ditching, 
and asked if it was hard at the bottom?-- 
"Aye," answered the countryman, "it is 
hard enough at the bottom I'll warrant 



you." But in a naif dozen steps, the 
horse sunk up to the saddle skirts, which 
made the younggallant whip, spur, curse 
and swear /sic7 . "Why thou lying rascal? 
/sic7 " said he to the clown, "didst thou 
not tell me it was hard at the bottom?" 
"Aye," replied the other, "but you are not 
half way to the bottom yet." 

A NEW SOPHIA THOREAU LETTER . . . . WH 

President Evald B. Lawson of Upsala College 
in East Orange, New Jersey, calls our attention to 
the following manuscript letter in his possession. 
It was written by Thoreau' s sister four days be- 
fore his death and invites Edmund Hosmer to spend 
the night sitting up with Thoreau. Hosmer, inci- 
dentally, at Thoreau 1 s own request, spent the last 
night of Thoreau' s life at his side, and only a 
few hours before he passed away, Thoreau requested 
his sister to give Hosmer a copy of one of his 
books: 

Friday May 2nd, 
My dear Miss Hosmer, 

We remember your fathers kind offer to 
assist us in our affliction, and it will 
be very agreeable to us all if he can be 
with us tonight, please ask him if it is 
convenient. My dear brother has failed 
very much since your father last saw him. 
Yours truly, 

S. E. Thoreau. 



Charles Tweedy ©f West Somerville, Mass., has 
pointed out to us that most editions of Thoreau' s 
"Life without Principle" make two serious reprints. 
In the paragraph beginning "The rush to California 
. . . "many print "immortality" for immorality" 
and "muck-rate" for "muck-rake," thus making non- 
sense of the paragraph. 

Ely Stock is currently working on a doctoral 
dissertation at Brown University in American Civi- 
lization on "The Use of the Bible in the Work of 
Hawthorne, Melville, Pow, Emerson, Thoreau & Whit- 
man." 

On December 2, 1963, Louis E. Hoffman, Dean 
of Instruction at Los Angeles Pierce College, con- 
ducted an institute on "The Mythic in Walden."